Tag Archives: social security

Push and pull

There’s been a lot of strange back-and-forths in the news this week. Here’s a short list of some interesting forms of that which I saw crop up in the past couple days.

From Sanders to Clinton, yet again

I’ve written here before about one of the key dynamics in the current Democratic presidential primary being how further left critics of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have nudged her into adopting more liberal policy proposals. With Clinton largely holding her own on issues of social justice, the main part of that has been on economic policy. Most obviously, sitting Vermont Senator and fellow candidate Bernie Sanders has effectively pushed Clinton into adopting similar platforms to him on the availability of higher education.

That said, similar efforts to promote unionization and financial industry regulation haven’t (yet?) become shared policy ideas between Sanders and Clinton. On Tuesday, the Campaign for America’s Future asked if one of the most recent iterations of those economic politics from the Sanders-Warren wing of the Democratic Party might be picked up by Clinton. In this case, it’s a repeal of a “performance pay” tax exemption for larger companies in order to pay for cost of living adjustments for Social Security recipients. Fresh from having failed to assure a number of people that she wants to protect Social Security in the long term, Clinton might need to pick this battle, unless she wants to write off a large chunk of the Democratic primary vote.

The Keystone Pipeline is dead! Long live the Keystone Pipeline!

Recently, the proposal to build a new pipeline from Canada to shipping areas in the southern US was officially rejected by the Obama administration. The company that has been seeking the pipeline’s construction for years now thinks they might have another Clinton-economics-related shot at getting it done in spite of that though: NAFTA. As the Hill put it, they “could ask a tribunal to mandate compensation from the United States for rejecting the pipeline, or even require that the project be approved.” With the possibility of the Trans-Pacific Partnership looming in our future, it seems important to note how its smaller, weaker predecessor allows business interests to challenge and even overrule the decisions of a democratically-elected government.

Who will survive in America?

One of the criticisms of the Keystone Pipeline, is the displacement that it already has begun to cause within certain rural communities. Unfortunately, that upheaval is hardly unique to that specific part of the US, as artist and astrophysicist Nia Imara documented in her recent photography project about gentrification in Oakland. The East Bay Express published earlier this week a short but intriguing look into her process and relationship with the community while creating her work.

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Is Obama the next Thatcher?

TW: Apartheid South Africa, Pinochet-era Chile, class inequality

Throughout today I’ve been preemptively greeting people with facts about the United Kingdom’s former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher to stave off any eulogizing or other fond memories of her. For instance, did you know she called the African National Congress (the popular movement that eventually toppled the Apartheid government of South Africa) a “typical terrorist organization“? Because after all, the brutally colonial governance of an indigenous population by somewhere between 5 and 10 percent of the whole population is such a noble political situation. And maintaining it was key in the battle against communism. Likewise, concerning renowned Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet, Thatcher explained her support for his regime on the basis that he was “bringing democracy to Chile“. As we all know, nothing says democracy like a coup that killed thousands and forces thousands more the flee the country in terror. But at least the democratically-elected socialist wasn’t in charge of a country in another hemisphere entirely from Britain.


(There’s a reason these sorts of events have been popular for years. From here.)

It’s common for critics to compare her with her US contemporary, former President Ronald Reagan, but I think another comparison might be called for today: that of her and current President Barack Obama. Both of them cracked a glass ceiling, but seem dishearteningly to more represent a new spirit of inclusion and openness than actually embody it. For the past few months, the unemployment rate among Black Americans has averaged twice what it is among White Americans. Obama’s governance doesn’t seem to have made any significant dent in racist hiring and firing practices within the United States. While many major media outlets were narrowly focused on the risk of US-supplied weapons ending up in islamists’ hands, they overlooked the meaning behind that – the Obama administration had continued to supply weapons to undemocratic regimes throughout the Arab world even as the Arab Spring mounted and anti-protester violence grew more endemic.

Most recently, Obama has put forward a plan to switch from standard to “chained” inflation adjustments for social security and similar government assistance programs’ payouts. That this comes now, after years of slowing wage increases mere symbolizes how tidily Obama’s governance has fit into many larger economic trends in the US. He hasn’t been disruptive, but rather a great facilitator… of the same underlying principles in US politics that had been unquestionable to the point of invisibility.

I wonder if we’ll remember Obama the way many Brits are remembering Thatcher today: as being remarkable merely as a symbol that their group could occasionally have access to controlling a destructive political system. Will both be remembered as history’s tokens?

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